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A Generation Apart: Young people, trade unionism and the everyday struggles of work

Since the end of the 1970s, trade unionism amongst young people in Australia has experienced a period of sustained and severe decline. Recently, this decline has occurred concurrently with rapid changes to the labour market, employment relations and the broader industrial landscape of the post-crisis political economy, which has left many young people locked into insecure working arrangements for much longer periods than previous generations. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on young people and trade unionism. This thesis explores the decline in unionism amongst young people, within a political economy of work that is increasingly precarious and individualised. In order to explore these complex, intertwined issues, I will employ a mixed methods approach that utilises both qualitative and quantitative data drawn from a longitudinal study. By employing this mixed-methods approach, this research aims to contribute to existing scholarship on the political economy of youth, the sociology of youth and young adulthood, trade unionism, generation, social change and the sociology of work. It aims to provide insight into the experience of work as reported by young people and to explore the strategies available to young people as they encounter challenges within a post-crisis political economy, including trade unionism.

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Governing Australian Academics: An analysis of governance and subjectivity in Australian universities (awarded 2017)

Author: Fabian Cannizzo

This dissertation addresses the question of how academic work is governed in universities in the twenty-first century. It identifies the factors shaping academic governance in public universities. Recent research suggests that academics operating in such settings confront values tensions emerging from the restructuring of higher education within global knowledge economies. A managerial ethos is becoming ever more present, stemming from the uptake of both neoliberal higher education and research policies at the international and national levels and the uptake of performance management systems at the level of the university.
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