Top Menu

Topics Archives: Space Making

Towards De(s)colonial Research in the Global Rural: A Feminist Feeling-Thinking Study with Rural Women in Colombia

This dissertation is a feminist de(s)colonial study with rural women in Colombia. It documents and validates the lives, labour and agency of rural women by re-signifying place as a site of resistance and negotiation within a neoliberal context. In using descolonialism as the epistemology for this thesis, I implemented a feminist participatory visual methodology, collecting data from two case studies in the towns of Toca and Minca. The data demonstrate that rural women are agents in place, resisting colonial practices. While campesina women experience social inequality, they enact resistance in places such as the home, vereda, and the city, and contest violence against their territories bodies-lands. As such, rural women in Colombia challenge their positioning by hegemonic feminisms and neoliberal projects as lacking agency and in need of saving. The research demonstrates the importance of feminist, feeling-thinking, place-based research to conceptualising the countryside as an embodied relational space constituted by multiplicities and histories. Overall, this thesis contributes to the growing literature emerging from the Global South that makes visible and supports the progressive politics and new paradigms that question the colonial bias of hegemonic feminisms and neoliberal projects.

Share
Continue Reading

Engaging with diversity through sport in a super-diverse neighbourhood

Multiculturalism and the management of diversity are of growing personal and political importance due to changing demographic urban settings. This ethnographic research explores how neighbourhood residents engage with ethnic and cultural diversity through sport participation. Following an everyday multiculturalism approach, I explore how everyday face-to-face interactions form the basis for identity construction and experiences of (local) belonging. Sport is a key public social context that has immense social and cultural importance in modern times. Neighbourhoods provide excellent settings to study inter-ethnic encounters and makes it possible to fully capture urban super-diversity, as single sport clubs or sites can be quite homogenous. This research will take place in Footscray, a super-diverse western inner suburb of Melbourne. Participants’ experiences are examined through ethnographic methods combined with a micro-ethnographic approach using video-recording and analysis. In my PhD-project, I connect geography (space making specifically) and social processes that will enable me to explore the role of sport as an institution and as an embodied activity in the formation of identities and the production of diversity discourses. This knowledge will identify ways to enhance social cohesion in highly diverse neighbourhoods.

By Jora Broerse
Victoria University, Melbourne
Supervisors: Prof. Ramón Spaaij and Dr. Brent McDonald

Share
Continue Reading